Tracking the Vanishing Frogs
- Supplement
Our Stolen Future

BOOK ASSIGNMENT:
Tracking the Vanishing Frogs

Book assignments may be done individually or in groups of no more than three people. If working in a group, all of you should read the book, and have thought about the answers before you meet and finalize the answers. All group assignments must be signed by hand by each of the members of the group. The signatures denote the agreement of the group that all members participated in the preparation of the answers. All group members receive the same grade.

Tracking the Vanishing Frogs is intended primarily to give you an idea of the process of science, its involvement and relation to the understanding of complex environmental problems, the premises of the scientific method, the differences between science and action, and the adequacy of science in helping us make environmental decisions. In addition, this book has clear and concise descriptions of many environmental phenomena including global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and loss of biodiversity. Read and make careful notes in order to help you understand the book fully.

Questions:

  1. (a) In a paragraph or so, describe the history and main clauses of the Endangered Species Act.
    (b) Find the names of two endangered species in your state? What causes would you attribute to this endangerment?

  2. Use specific examples from the book to discuss the following with respect to how it may help or hinder progress in averting species extinction. (Cite the pages that form the source of your examples.)
    (a) the role of statistics in scientific evidence.
    (b) establishing a cause of what is observed.

  3. Describe the chain of events that led to the extinction (or suspected extinction) of one of the frog populations described in the book. Draw a clear concept map to accompany this description.

  4. What are the main lessons you carry away from this book? What were some of the surprises for you?

  5. Name any animal populations that have become extinct in your lifetime.

 

 

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  ©Copyright 2003 Carnegie Mellon University
This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 9653194. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.